FAQs

Below you will find answers to some of Dover Township’s most Frequently Asked Questions:

 

Zoning and Building (16)

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A Stormwater Management (SWM) Permit Application must be completed for any improvements that will result in 100 square feet or more of new impervious (water cannot get through) surface.  Examples would include sheds, home additions, patios and driveways. A copy of our Stormwater Management Permit Application can be obtained by clicking the following link:

SWM Permit Application

The SWM application is typically completed at the time a building permit application is completed. Following the completion of a SWM application, Township Staff will utilize the following criteria in reviewing the application and information provided as part of the building permit application.

 

  • Will the project result in 1000 square feet or more of new impervious surface?
    • Yes, the applicant will be required to provide a SWM Site Plan which will require the services of a qualified professional. The completed SWM Site Plan will then need to be reviewed and approved by the Township Engineer before Township Staff can issue a SWM Permit.
    • No, Township Staff will review the SWM Application and will work with the Property Owner and/or Contractor to determine the Best Management Practice (BMP) to be used for managing rainwater runoff from the new impervious surface.

 

  • Does the project site qualify as a Disconnected Impervious Area (DIA)?
    • Yes, there are adequate on-site conditions to ensure that runoff from the new impervious surface will infiltrate into the soil and not leave the property. If the site is approved for a DIA, the completion of an SWM Permit will not be required.
    • No, some form of Structural BMP will be required such as infiltration beds, infiltration trenches, and/or Rain Gardens. The completion of a SWM Permit will be required.

 

A copy of our SWM Small Project Guide can be obtained by clicking on the following link:

SWM Small Project Guide

Our SWM Small Project Guide describes the on-site conditions necessary to qualify for a Disconnected Impervious Area (DIA) along with specifications and diagrams of the structural BMPs (beds, trenches, and Rain Gardens) that Township Staff can approve and permit.


The Property Owner and his/her Contractor are responsible to see that the structural BMP is constructed according to Township specifications and requirements. Dover Township will require a construction phase inspection to verify that these are being met.

The Small Project Stormwater Management Permit will also list the Property Owner’s responsibilities to Maintain and Inspect Structural BMPs.


Driveway permits are necessary if located within a public right of way.


Many projects related to home or property improvement do require permits.  Sheds 100 to 999 square feet require a zoning permit.  Zoning permits are also required for fencing, patios, some decks and some driveway repairs.

 

Larger accessory structures such as sheds, garages, additions, decks and pools require building permits.

 

The permit applications are the same and both require site plans, although building permits require two sets of specs to be submitted along with the application.

 

Fees for zoning permits are $50.00 plus any stormwater fee. Fees for building permits start at $50.00 (for a project with an estimated cost of less than $8,000.00); or $6.00 per each $1,000.00 of estimated cost of the project plus plan review fees and inspection costs, determined by our Third Party Inspection Agency plus any stormwater fee.

 

Many cosmetic home improvements do not require permits.

 

These projects may include:

  • replacement doors or windows with the same size doors or windows and no structural alterations.
  • replacing shingled roofing, including felt paper underlayment, flashing, gutters and downspouts with no structural alterations.
  • replacing siding with no structural alterations.
  • finishing basements that do not include bedrooms.  Mechanicals need to be sized appropriately for additional conditioned space.

 

In addition, any new project creating impervious area will require a Stormwater Permit Application, possible stormwater management for the project and a stormwater fee associated with the project.

 

 

Please call the Building Department at (717) 292-3634 if you have questions or for clarifications.


Sanitary Sewer Collections (14)

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Please provide the Township office with contact information such as telephone number and mailing address.  We recently made public announcements through our auto dialer system and were told by several residents that their neighbors got the call but they did not.

The reason:  We did not have your contact information.  PLEASE make sure you get the next notification should there be one, by providing us with your telephone number and e-mail address.


Dover Township owns and operates the Township’s water system.

The Dover Township Sewer Authority owns our sewer system, the Joint (inter-municipal) Interceptor and the Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant.

Dover Township operates our sewer system, the Joint Interceptor and the wastewater treatment plant.


The township taxes do not pay for the cost of utilities (water and sewer).  The utilities are paid totally by users’ fees.  Treatment costs for septic and holding tank wastes must be paid for by the contracting haulers.  It’s not fair for township residents that pay a sewer fee to subsidize residents that are not hooked into the sewer.


Between 8:00am and 4:30pm, please call Dover Township at (717) 292-3634.

After hours please call 911.


Taxes (7)

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The elected Tax Collector has a duty to collect current year taxes for three separate organizations.  They are the Dover Area School District, York County and Dover Township.  The Tax Collector collects the real estate taxes for all three of these entities.

As of 2016, the per capita has been repealed.

Delinquent Real Estate taxes are turned over to the York County Tax Claim Bureau at year end.


The Tax Collector can be reached at (717) 292-4046


The Tax Collector’s hours are:

  • Monday & Wednesday     12:00 pm to 5:00 pm
  • Tuesday & Thursday        09:00 am to 5:00 pm

A drop box has been provided for your convenience in the front of the office for after hours.


The Dover Township and York County real estate tax bills are mailed by February 15th each year.  They are usually mailed in the same envelop.  The bill includes a municipal tax line item (Dover Township) and a county tax line item (York County).

Dover Area School District Taxes are mailed by July 15th of each year.

Where do I go to pay my real estate and per capita taxes?

The elected Tax Collector has an office at the Dover Township Community Building located 3700 Davidsburg Road, Dover, PA 17315.


Brush and Leaf Collection (8)

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Our equipment in not designed to vacuum long or heavy objects they cause the vacuum tube to clog and heavy items such as logs can damage the impeller.


If the snowfall is not a substantial snowfall (greater than 4″) and leaves are visible enough to find, we will continue leaf collection.


Curbside collection of leaves and brush follow the same rules as trash collection. Leaf and brush collection are considered a moving work zone. Signage would not keep up to the pace of the collection and may confuse motorists.


We deliver leaves to some fields and to a company that will turn the leaves into mulch. Grass holds moisture that creates mold and heat. The mulch company cannot have mold in the mulch and the heat generated can cause a fire.

 

In addition, please do not dispose of grass clippings near or within watercourses. This is consider a violation of the following Township Ordinance. Please dispose of grass clippings properly.

 

§19-808. Watercourse Protection.

  1. Every person owning property through which a watercourse passes, or such person’s lessee, shall keep and maintain that part of the watercourse within the property free of trash, debris, excessive vegetation, and other obstacles that would pollute, contaminate, or significantly retard the flow of water through the watercourse.

 


Water System (13)

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Periodically, you will see Water Dept personnel releasing water from hydrants. Hydrant flushing is necessary to test the hydrants to make sure adequate flow and pressure is available. Flushing is also done to remove sediment from the pipes in order to maintain water clarity and quality in the distribution pipes.

Your water is safe to drink. Occasionally, water becomes discolored after hydrant flushing. If this happens, run your cold water tap for a few minutes until the water clears. If it doesn’t clear the first time, wait a few minutes and run the water again. You should avoid washing clothes until the water clears.

Rusty Water

As described in the previous section, fire hydrants are periodically opened to flush water mains in the system. Additionally, Fire and Public Works Department personnel routinely use hydrants to make assessments as to whether adequate pressure and flow are available to satisfy normal system demands as well as the increased demand required in the event of a fire. These actions, as well as some construction activities, may result in brief periods during which you may observe moderate discoloration in your tap water.

Cloudy / Milky Water

In the late fall and winter months the water that enters your homes can be quite cold. When this cold water enters your home plumbing, it is exposed to significantly warmer temperatures. This causes dissolved oxygen, that can reach significantly higher levels in colder water than in warmer water, to escape in the form of “micro-bubbles” that can give water a cloudy appearance. If a glass of this water is allowed to sit for a short period of time the cloudy effect will dissipate.

White Particles in the Water

It has been determined that a number of hot water heaters manufactured between 1993 and 1997 may have defective cold water supply dip-tubes. These tubes are designed to direct the cold water entering the heaters to the bottom, thereby forcing the previously heated water to the hot water outlet near the top of the tank. The defective dip tubes have been found to separate from the cold water inlet and, over time, disintegrate into minute pieces resembling crumbled eggshells.

This material can readily clog sink aerators and showerheads but is said to be non-toxic.

For more information please contact Dover Township Water Dept (717) 292-3634


Water conservation is an increasingly critical concern for people across the globe.
According to the United Nations, more than one out of six people (1.1 billion) in the world lack access to safe drinking water, and more than two out of six (2.6 billion) lack adequate sanitation.
As global population continues to rise, the resulting increase in demand for clean water will put enormous strain on the environment and some experts predict that the global wars of the next generation will be fought not over fossil fuels, but water.
Pollution:

Scarce water resources are fragile and very susceptible to industrial contaminants from factories and agricultural runoff.

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a very volatile and toxic class of odorless, tasteless chemicals that were used in the first half of the 20th century in many industrial applications. In the 1970s research proved that PCBs were highly carcinogenic and were making their way into the American water system in high concentrations. Since the 1970s their manufacture, use and transportation have been highly curtailed, though PCBs are just one of many potentially lethal water contaminants.

Water-borne vector diseases like malaria still plague many parts of the Third World and the use of pesticides to curb these diseases has equally harmful effects on water sources
Preservation and Conservation:

Preservation is the act of protecting existing water quality from future contamination and pollution. Conservation is the physical act of changing individual behavior to use less.
Depletion and impairment of water resources from irresponsible overusage results in shortages when demand outpaces supply. Droughts and shortages are especially prevalent in the American West and have reached critical levels in sub-Saharan Africa.

What Can We Do?

The average American household can conserve water and save money by implementing some very simple tips and advice. Repair leaky faucets and other outlets. Install low-pressure shower heads and low-flow toilets. Take shorter showers. Run dishwashers and clothes washers only when they are full to capacity. Compost organic waste instead of running it through a garbage disposer. Water your lawn every other day in the summertime, and never between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. Reduce the use of pesticides and fertilizer. Wash your car from a bucket rather than at a car wash. Store drinking water in the refrigerator rather than running the faucet until it runs cold.


Turn off the water at the exterior. Make sure that the water supply is turned off completely at the main supply point. If the furnace should fail on a very cold day, water in a pipe could freeze and burst the pipe. To turn water off to the exterior please call the Dover Township Water Dept @ 717-292-3634Note: The water meter should be disconnected and Drained to prevent meter from damage.

  1. Open all faucets and drain all waterlines. If you live in an area where freezing pipes can be a problem, drain the toilets, the water heater (turn off the gas or electric supply first) and the expansion tank.
    • get a air compressor to blow the lines of excess water. Eliminate or dilute the water in drain traps by pouring an “RV” type antifreeze solution into them, as directed by the instructions.
    • Close the sink and tub drains.
    • If a house is to be vacant for a long time, you may prevent water in a toilet’s trap from evaporating (and thereby permitting sewer gases to enter the home) by raising the toilet’s lid and seat and covering the bowl with saran wrap.
    • Turn off and drain fountains and other sources of standing water.
    • Drain water from dishwashers and pour RV antifreeze. with refrigerators (with a water dispenser or an ice maker) and washing machines, following the manufacturer’s directions. Remove the water filter from inside the refrigerator.

It has been determined that a number of hot water heaters manufactured between 1993 and 1997 may have defective cold water supply dip-tubes. These tubes are designed to direct the cold water entering the heaters to the bottom, thereby forcing the previously heated water to the hot water outlet near the top of the tank. The defective dip tubes have been found to separate from the cold water inlet and, over time, disintegrate into minute pieces resembling crumbled eggshells.

This material can readily clog sink aerators and showerheads but is said to be non-toxic.


Utility Billing (4)

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This depends on your account number. If your account number beings with:

  • 0 – your bill months are January, April, July and October
  • 1 – your bill months are January, April, July and October
  • 2 – your bill months are February, May, August and November
  • 3 – your bill months are March, June, September and December
  • 6 – your bill months are February, May, August and November

You should always have your bill by the 5th of these months. If you do not receive your bill by that date, please contact the office for your bill amount due, so you can avoid late fees.

Typically your bill will be due on the 15th  of the same month.   After the due date a penalty will be assessed.

Make sure that if you move or are going to be away from home when your bill is scheduled to arrive, that you provide an updated address to us, so that you can receive you bill in a timely manner and avoid being charged a late fee.


Dover Township bills property owners only.  If your landlord has it in the lease that you are responsible for the water and sewer bills, it will be up to them to contact our office and authorize redirection of the bill.  We cannot change the bill based on the tenant notification.


You may pay by mail (no cash please), in the office (open Monday through Friday from 8:00 am to 4:30 pm), or use our drop slot (conveniently located in the vestibule area, which is accessible 7 days a week/24 hrs. a day).  You may also pay by credit card on our website ONLY by clicking here.  There will be a convenience fee if paying by credit card as we use a third party processor to process the credit card payments for security purposes.


Please provide the Township office with contact information such as telephone number and mailing address.  We recently made public announcements through our auto dialer system and were told by several residents that their neighbors got the call but they did not.

The reason:  We did not have your contact information.  PLEASE make sure you get the next notification should there be one, by providing us with your telephone number and e-mail address.


WWTP (16)

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This treatment plant has a design capacity to treat an average of 8 million gallons per day and consists of a sewage grinder, pumps, grit removal systems, Biological Nutrient Removal Carrousel systems, final clarifiers, and ultraviolet light disinfection.  The removed contaminants, called sludge, are thickened, aerobically stabilized, and dewatered prior to disposal.  More information can be found on the WWTP pages.


Sludge is a generic term for the solids removed from any plant.  These solids are treated at this facility by aerobic digestion. This is a natural biological process that utilizes existing bacteria to stabilize the solids.  The stabilized sludge, called biosolids, must meet many strict State and Federal requirements before it can be applied to farmland.  The liquid biosolids are pumped to the  centrifuges where it is dewatered to approximately 20% solids concentration.  The dewatered biosolids have a look of damp rich soil and has an earthy/slightly musty odor.


The wastewater treatment system is owned by the Dover Township Sewer Authority and is leased to Dover Township to operate and maintain the system. Plant operation is done by highly trained and certified operators who are employees of Dover Township.  After a thorough training and exam process, operators are licensed by Pennsylvania DEP.


The plant has a diesel-powered emergency generator.


Stormwater (4)

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A Watercourse is a stream, river, brook, creek, channel, ditch or swale where water flows on a continuous, seasonal, or intermittent basis. A watercourse can be natural or manmade.


As the property owner, you are responsible to maintain the Watercourse. This means keeping it free of trash, debris, excessive vegetation, and obstacles that could block the flow of water. You also have the responsibility to prevent pollution and contamination of the water flowing through the Watercourse.


A Stormwater Management (SWM) Permit Application must be completed for any improvements that will result in 100 square feet or more of new impervious (water cannot get through) surface.  Examples would include sheds, home additions, patios and driveways. A copy of our Stormwater Management Permit Application can be obtained by clicking the following link:

SWM Permit Application

The SWM application is typically completed at the time a building permit application is completed. Following the completion of a SWM application, Township Staff will utilize the following criteria in reviewing the application and information provided as part of the building permit application.

 

  • Will the project result in 1000 square feet or more of new impervious surface?
    • Yes, the applicant will be required to provide a SWM Site Plan which will require the services of a qualified professional. The completed SWM Site Plan will then need to be reviewed and approved by the Township Engineer before Township Staff can issue a SWM Permit.
    • No, Township Staff will review the SWM Application and will work with the Property Owner and/or Contractor to determine the Best Management Practice (BMP) to be used for managing rainwater runoff from the new impervious surface.

 

  • Does the project site qualify as a Disconnected Impervious Area (DIA)?
    • Yes, there are adequate on-site conditions to ensure that runoff from the new impervious surface will infiltrate into the soil and not leave the property. If the site is approved for a DIA, the completion of an SWM Permit will not be required.
    • No, some form of Structural BMP will be required such as infiltration beds, infiltration trenches, and/or Rain Gardens. The completion of a SWM Permit will be required.

 

A copy of our SWM Small Project Guide can be obtained by clicking on the following link:

SWM Small Project Guide

Our SWM Small Project Guide describes the on-site conditions necessary to qualify for a Disconnected Impervious Area (DIA) along with specifications and diagrams of the structural BMPs (beds, trenches, and Rain Gardens) that Township Staff can approve and permit.


The Property Owner and his/her Contractor are responsible to see that the structural BMP is constructed according to Township specifications and requirements. Dover Township will require a construction phase inspection to verify that these are being met.

The Small Project Stormwater Management Permit will also list the Property Owner’s responsibilities to Maintain and Inspect Structural BMPs.


Highway (8)

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When development occurs, the developer maintains ownership of all the roads within the subdivision until 90% of the homes have been completed.  At that point, the developer requests a final walk through and a punch-list is created.  After the punch-list is complete, the wearing or top coat is applied to road surface and the road is offered to the Township as a public street.  The Township is not responsible to maintain roads in any way that have not be dedicated.


Regulatory signs require a traffic study.  Some traffic studies can be performed by our Public Works Director, while others require assistance from another agency.  Please contact our Public Works Director regarding specifics.

Non-regulatory signs like children at play, deaf child area, etc. do not usually require a study.  However, residents may be required to pay for the cost of installing such signs.  Please contact the Public Works Director with your issue to find out the details.


Northern York County Regional Police Department handles traffic enforcement within Dover Township.  Please visit their website here.


Driveway permits are necessary if located within a public right of way.


Trash and Recycling (16)

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If you see someone taking your recycling from the bin, call 911 to report it.  This is illegal.  The recycling collected in the Township is reported by the ton each year to the Department of Environmental Protection. The Township receives grant monies to help pay for brush and leaf collection costs through this funding.


Dover Township no longer accepts electronics and you cannot dispose of them in your regular trash or recycling pickup. If you would like to dispose of electronics, please contact the York County Solid Waste Authority using the information below:

YORK COUNTY SOLID WASTE AUTHORITY
2700 Black Bridge Rd
York, PA 17402
Phone: (717) 845-1066
Hours: Monday – Friday 8:00am to 5:00pm
Website: http://www.ycswa.org/

 

FAIRVIEW TOWNSHIP
55 Fairview Rd
New Cumberland, PA 17070
Phone: (717) 901-5200
Hours: Monday – Friday 8:00am to 4:30pm
Website: http://twp.fairview.pa.us/


The blue recycling bins that are provided by Dover Township are 42 gallons.


For a current list of recyclable items, please check Penn Waste’s website here.